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Your Dream Garden Is Just A Few Days Away!

Does everyone else’s grass always seem to look greener? It’s possible in your mind’s eye that the neighbor is doing something unique. Producing beautiful flowers, delicious vegetables and a luscious landscape is within your reach. You just have to learn how to properly maintain your plants. Reading the advice from this article can help you on your path to horticulture wisdom.

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Plant slug-proof perennials. Creatures like snails or slugs can destroy a plant in a single night. These pests prefer plants with thin smooth leaves. Plant some helleborus or euphorbias along with your other perennials. Some perennials are not preferred meals for snails and slugs, especially if their foliage is hairy and tough, or tastes bad. Wonderful varieties of such perennials include euphorbia, campanula, helleborus, achillea, and heuchera.

TIP! Your tool handles can double as measuring sticks. Tools with long handles, such as rakes, shovels or hoes can work as great measuring sticks.

When mowing your lawn, avoid mowing the grass too short. Cutting your grass at a taller height allows grass roots to grow deeper and stronger, which helps lessen the chance of your lawn drying out easily. Short grass leads to more shallow roots and will result in more brown, dried-out patches.

Interested in using Mother Nature to keep pests at bay the natural way? Slugs stay away from marigolds and onions when they are planted in a garden. Using wood ash as mulch around the base of trees and shrub seedlings will also help keep away insect pests. Natural materials and plants can be just as effective as chemical pesticides at keeping unwanted visitors out of your garden!

Consider what particular vegetables are most often on your dining room table and include them when you plan your garden. You will then be able to reduce your food costs every month and you can then get a great return on your garden. You want to avoid planting anything you don’t use or eat, particularly if you don’t have much room to garden.

TIP! Divide irises. Splitting up overgrown groups of irises will allow you to easily increase the number of irises in your garden.

Plant shrubs that have decorative fall fruit. September to November is usually thought of as the season of orange leaves, but some trees produce fruit that really go well with the fall color scheme. The berries, which last deep into the winter, blossom in magnificent shades of yellow and red, adding a burst of color to an otherwise drab landscape. Good varieties include holly, crabapple, hawthorn and chokeberry.

Remember to remove weeds from the garden. Weeds will cause your garden to become overgrown and cluttered. To help with weed destruction, use white vinegar. The acidity of the vinegar is harmful to most plants. Load up your spray bottle with some white vinegar, and spray the weeds away instead of breaking your back removing them by hand.

Vegetables are softest during the warmest hours of each day, so picking them then, no matter how gently, runs the risk of damage. Cut vegetables off at the vine, and don’t twist them off, as this could hurt the plant.

TIP! Start your garden by planting seed in small pots. When starting a new garden, the most environmentally friendly way is to start from seed.

If you can’t wait for a cut to heal before digging in the dirt, then at least protect your cuts from exposure. If grime gets into the cut, it could become infected. The key is to use bandages capable of covering cuts in their entirety.

As you can see, the tips in this article are easy to implement. All you have to do is implement what you have just learned. Monitor your plants carefully to assess whether you are getting the results you want from certain techniques or approaches. If something does not work, try something else. Be patient, and before long, your garden will be the envy of your neighbors.